Dog bites that require hospitalization for your child’s severe injuries could result in compensation. By filing a legal action against an animal’s owner, the court may provide relief for medical bills, reconstructive surgery and rehabilitation.

If you needed to take days off from work to care for your injured child, you may recover your lost wages. The pain and suffering someone’s animal put your family through could also result in a compassionate jury awarding additional damages.

Who has liability over a dog bite?

North Carolina’s laws hold dangerous dog owners strictly liable for any injuries caused by their animals’ bites or attacks. When an otherwise calm pet goes on an attack because its owner carelessly let it off its leash, you may file a legal action over injuries caused by the owner’s negligence.

How do I know a dog is dangerous?

As reported by WRAL Investigates, bites from pit bulls made up about 65% of the dog attacks studied. While all breeds can bite, the Tar Heel State’s law considers a dog dangerous if it has a known propensity for biting without provocation.

Dogs specifically trained by their owners to fight or attack can also classify as dangerous. Their owners must use reasonable care to prevent their animals from causing harm and can face strict liability over a breach of care.

When can I file a lawsuit?

Under North Carolina’s statute of limitations, you have three years from the date of an animal attack to initiate a legal action. Even if a dog not considered dangerous has never attacked before, its owner can face liability for negligence by unintentionally letting it run loose.